Mahler Symphony No. 5 (2014)

Mahler

The Colburn Orchestra

Gerard Schwarz

This album celebrates Gerard Schwarz at the top of his game, conducting music close to Jerry’s heart.   Maestro Schwarz served long tenures as music director for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and later the Seattle Symphony, and made over 100 recordings with those orchestras. 
The Colburn Orchestra is well-known from its recordings on Yarlung with Yehuda Gilad conducting Metropolitan Opera and GRAMMY Award® winning mezzo soprano Sasha Cooke (YAR14148) and with Maestro Schwarz conducting Takemitsu’s From Me Flows What You Call Time (YAR15195) featuring Smoke & Mirrors percussion ensemble.  The orchestra has been conducted by James Conlon, Jamie Laredo, Sir Neville Marriner, Kurt Masur, Nicolas McGegan, Esa-Pekka Salonen and Gustavo Dudamel.
In 2012, the Colburn Orchestra opened the GRAMMY Foundation’s 14th Annual Music Preservation Project.  Concertgoers and press celebrate The Colburn Orchestra for the quality of its performances and music director Yehuda Gilad’s creative leadership.  Maestro Schwarz describes The Colburn Orchestra as “without question, among the finest orchestras in the world.”
Yarlung recorded this album directly to two tracks of RMGI 468 analog tape running at 15 ips, with no mixer.  We used the Hapi converter and Pyramix software from Merging Technologies in Switzerland to make these transfers to DSD.  Our sincere thanks to George Klissarov and exaSound for making these releases possible. 

Bob Attiyeh, producer

 

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The Colburn Orchestra

Celebrating its tenth anniversary season in 2012-2013, the COLBURN ORCHESTRA is the flagship ensemble of the Colburn Conservatory of Music. Under the direction of Music Director and Conductor Yehuda Gilad, the Colburn Orchestra performs for Southern California audiences at venues such as Walt Disney Concert Hall, Ambassador Auditorium, Royce Hall, Segerstrom Concert Hall and the Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge.

Since its inception, Gilad and the esteemed faculty at Colburn have invited leading guest artists to perform with the Colburn Orchestra to mirror a professional orchestral experience. Previous visiting conductors include James Conlon, Jamie Laredo, Sir Neville Marriner, Kurt Masur, Nicolas McGegan, and Esa-Pekka Salonen, among others. Guest soloists include violinists Joshua Bell, Cho-Liang Lin, Elmar Oliveira and Pinchas Zukerman (play/conduct); soprano Elizabeth Hynes; mezzo-sopranos Sasha Cooke and Michelle DeYoung; pianist Vladimir Feltsman and saxophonist Claude Delangle. Esteemed artists such as Mstislav Rostropovich and Itzhak Perlman actively worked with the orchestra during its inaugural year.

 

Gerard Schwarz

This is Gerard Schwarz at the top of his game, conducting music close to Jerry’s heart.   Maestro Schwarz served long tenures as music director for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and later the Seattle Symphony, and made over 100 recordings with those orchestras. 

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Mahler Symphony No. 5 (2014)

Mahler

The Colburn Orchestra

    Fanfare and KUSC-FM

By any standard, this is a superlative Mahler Fifth; given that it’s a live performance by a student orchestra, it’s frankly jaw-dropping. Though less well known than Eastman, Juilliard, Curtis or the New England Conservatory, the Colburn School in downtown Los Angeles is one of America’s top-flight musical institutions– as may be gathered from the fact that it currently fields an orchestra every bit the equal of any of its venerable eastern rivals. But then again, with the American Youth Symphony, the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra, the USC Thornton Symphony and the UCLA Philharmonia – several of which are more than capable of mopping the floor with the highly touted Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra – Los Angeles has a fair claim to being the youth orchestra capitol of the world. What strikes you immediately is the absolute fearlessness of the playing: from the opening trumpet solo to the blazing final bars, these are not simply gifted kids letting adrenalin do the bulk of the work, but clear-eyed pre-professionals showing how comfortably they’d fit into any orchestra in the world. And while all the solo voices emerge with abundant character and courage, the ensemble playing is even more impressive. At no point does anything seem either tentative or insecure; in fact, after the first couple of minutes, you can simply take the playing for granted and enjoy the interpretation. As may be gathered from his Royal Liverpool Philharmonic recordings, Gerard Schwarz is an instinctive and hugely satisfying Mahler conductor, and is certainly one here. The first movement unfolds with all the angst and stygian darkness a funeral march deserves, while the stormy second movement follows the composer’s instructions to the letter, as it’s played “with greatest vehemence.” Two things stand out in the exceptional version of the Scherzo: an unmistakable (and irresistible) Viennese lilt in the central ländler (hardly a surprise, as the conductor was born of Austrian parents) and the playing of principal horn Johanna Yarbrough. In its combination of technical perfection and expressive swagger, it equals the horn playing in any commercial recording you’ve ever heard. (Following graduation from Colburn, she became a member of the horn section of the Detroit Symphony.) The Adagietto is rapt, ethereal, and mercifully free of sentimentality, while the concluding Rondo manages to be sure-footed and rollicking in roughly equal amounts. Recorded on magnetic tape – like Bis, Cedille, Chandos and Hyperion, Yarlung Records is one of the last labor-of-love/mad-monk recording companies left in Western lands – the album presents an extremely accurate sound picture of both Pasadena’s Ambassador Auditorium and this remarkable young orchestra. Buy it, put it on, and feel your jaw drop as well.

Jim Svejda

Mahler Symphony No. 5 (2014)

Mahler

The Colburn Orchestra

Mastering Engineer:

analog - Steve Hoffman, Bob Attiyeh

Yarlung recorded this album directly to two tracks of RMGI 468 analog tape running at 15 ips, with no mixer.  We used the Hapi converter and Pyramix software from Merging Technologies in Switzerland to make these transfers to DSD.  Our sincere thanks to George Klissarov and exaSound for making these releases possible. 
Bob Attiyeh, producer

 

Microphones:Neumann U47, AKG C12 Tube microphones
Producer:Bob Attiyeh
Recording Engineer:Bob Attiyeh
Recording location:Ambassador Auditorium Los Angeles
Recording Type & Bit Rate:Analog to DSD256

This album was recorded to Analog tape. It was then transferred to the DSD bit rate indicated above.

Quality & Channel Selection Digitized at Analog to DSD256
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YAR41014DSD: Mahler Symphony No. 5
01:04:21   Select quality & channels above
Tracks
1.
Trauermarsch
Mahler
00:11:03   Select quality & channels above
2.
Sturmisch bewegt, mit grosster Vehemenz
Mahler
00:12:54   Select quality & channels above
3.
Scherzo
Mahler
00:17:26   Select quality & channels above
4.
Adagietto
Mahler
00:09:13   Select quality & channels above
5.
Rondo-Finale
Mahler
00:13:45   Select quality & channels above

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