Dialoghi (2008)

Lutoslawski, Bach, Stucky, De Falla

David Fung, Elinor Frey

One can view the universe as a dialogue between emptiness and form: energy rises endlessly, finds momentary form, then dissolves once again into emptiness. Closer to “everyday life,” dialogue creates the fabric of our interpersonal relationships, our relationships with our communities, and our relationships with our selves. The music on this album reveals dialogues in many forms, often dialogues within dialogues. We hear these conversations between ‘cello and piano, old and new (Bach and Saariaho for example), between original and newly created (Machaut and Lefkowitz, for example), between Folk Music and “High Art” (de Falla and Bach, for example), between Nature and Art (Saariaho, for example), and in every piece between musician and audience and between composer and musician.
In discussing the music which forms the centerpiece of this program, Dialoghi–studi su un nome (Dialogues–Studies on a Name), composer Steven Stucky explains his title: “Why ‘dialogues’? Partly because the theme notes and the non-theme notes so often interact in “conversation” throughout, but more importantly because the friendship recognized in this rests not only on my musical collaborations with Elinor Frey but also on our conversations about books, music, paintings, films, psychology, religion, food, and all things Italian (hence the title).”
Elinor Frey and David Fung share an intimate dialogue with us in this album. This is Elinor’s debut album, but David we know from his prior recordings with ABC in Australia, and Yarlung Records in the United States. Indeed I play David’s solo piano recordings on my radio broadcasts. But the quality of musical collaboration on this disc reveals a sincere friendship that arose as a result of their rehearsals and performances together. Elinor and David remind me of a famous comment about Oscar Peterson and Billie Holiday performing together, that his special ability with music spread flower petals at her feet, upon which she then danced. David and Elinor communicate with sincerity and sympathetic sensitivity.
Great concert pianists, primarily famous as soloists or for their concerto repertoire, sometimes also reach heights of musical collaboration. Emanuel Ax, Alfred Brendel, Jeffrey Kahane and András Schiff come to mind, especially in concertperformances. Thank you Elinor and David for giving us musical dialogue of this caliber.then dissolves once again into emptiness. Closer to “everyday life,” dialogue creates the fabric of our interpersonal relationships, our relationships with our communities, and our relationships with our selves.
The music on this album reveals dialogues in many forms, often dialogues within dialogues. We hear these conversations between ‘cello and piano, old and new (Bach and Saariaho for example), between original and newly created (Machaut and Lefkowitz, for example), between Folk Music and “High Art” (de Falla and Bach, for example), between Nature and Art (Saariaho, for example), and in every piece between musician and audience and between composer and musician. In discussing the music which forms the centerpiece of this program, Dialoghi–studi su un nome (Dialogues–Studies on a Name), composer Steven Stucky explains his title: “Why ‘dialogues’? Partly because the theme notes and the non-theme notes so often interact in “conversation” throughout, but more importantly because the friendship recognized in this rests not only on my musical collaborations with Elinor Frey but also on our conversations about books, music, paintings, films, psychology, religion, food, and all things Italian (hence the title).” Elinor Frey and David Fung share an intimate dialogue with us in this album. This is Elinor’s debut album, but David we know from his prior recordings with ABC in Australia, and Yarlung Records in the United States. Indeed I play David’s solo piano recordings on my radio broadcasts. But the quality of musical collaboration on this disc reveals a sincere friendship that arose as a result of their rehearsals and performances together. Elinor and David remind me of a famous comment about Oscar Peterson and Billie Holiday performing together, that his special ability with music spread flower petals at her feet, upon which she then danced. David and Elinor communicate with sincerity and sympathetic sensitivity.
Great concert pianists, primarily famous as soloists or for their concerto repertoire, sometimes also reach heights of musical collaboration. Emanuel Ax, Alfred Brendel, Jeffrey Kahane and András Schiff come to mind, especially in concert performances. Thank you Elinor and David for giving us musical dialogue of this caliber.

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Elinor Frey

Fascinated with the cello’s origins and the creative process of new music, Elinor Frey plays both period and modern instruments. Frey’s honors include a US-Italy Fulbright Fellowship where she studied baroque cello with Paolo Beschi, the SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship, and American Musicological Society and Canada Council for the Arts grants facilitating her work on Italian cello music. In recent seasons she has performed with Ensemble Caprice, Tafelmusik, Les Idées hereuses, and Bradamante, as well as with her quartet, Pallade Musica, grand prize winners of the 2012 Early Music America Baroque Performance Competition and second prize winners in the 2014 International Van Wassenear Competition in Utrecht.

Frey’s debut album, Dialoghi, is titled for the solo piece written for her by Steven Stucky. Her two releases on the Belgian label Passacaille include the upcoming Berlin Sonatas with Lorenzo Ghielmi on fortepiano and the recent release, La voce del violoncello, praised for its “careful scholarship and brilliant layering of moods and tempos” (Toronto Star) and for the “honest, reflective beauty of her music making” (Strings). Her performance of this program was the winner of the public prize at the 2013 Utrecht Early Music Festival Fringe. Frey holds degrees from McGill, Mannes, and Juilliard.

David Fung

Described as “stylish and articulate” in the New York Times and praised as having “undoubted talent” by the Los Angeles Times, pianist David Fung is widely recognized for playing that is elegant and refined, yet deeply poetic and intensely expressive. A top prizewinner in two of the "big five" international piano competitions (the Queen Elisabeth in Brussels and the Arthur Rubinstein in Tel Aviv), Mr. Fung has appeared as guest soloist with all the major orchestras in his native Australia, including the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, and internationally with such ensembles as the Israel Camerata Orchestra, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, the Israel Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the National Orchestra of Belgium, the National Taiwan Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Chamber Orchestra of Wallonia, the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and the Xiamen Philharmonic Orchestra.

A frequent guest artist of concert series and festivals throughout the world, Mr. Fung has performed at the Aspen Music Festival, Atlantic Music Festival, Bari International Music Festival in Italy, Edinburgh International Festival, Music at Menlo, Ravinia Festival, and in New York's Carnegie Hall and Merkin Hall, Los Angeles' Walt Disney Concert Hall and Royce Hall, Wigmore Hall in London, Scotland's Queen’s Hall, Belgium's La Monnaie, Toronto's Glenn Gould Studio, the Sydney Opera House, the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, the National Concert Hall in Taiwan, and Israel's Mann Auditorium. At his Edinburgh International Festival debut, Jonas Green of the Edinburgh Guide described Mr. Fung as being “impossibly virtuosic, prodigiously talented... and probably [doing] ten more impossible things daily before breakfast.”

Highlights of the 13/14 season include the West Coast Premiere of Chen Qigang’s Piano Concerto “Er Huang” with Lan Shui and the San Francisco Symphony, Brahms Second Piano Concerto with Marin Alsop and the National Orchestra of Belgium, Mozart Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major with Michael Hofstetter and the Royal Chamber Orchestra, and debuts at the Ravinia Festival, the Atlantic Music Festival, Salle Henry le Boeuf at the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Flagey and La Monnaie in Belgium, the National Concert Hall in Taiwan, the EPCOR Center for the Performing Arts in Calgary, the DiMenna Center in New York, and return performances at Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall and the Bari International Music Festival in Italy. He also appeared in recital with soprano Amando Roocroft, ‘cellist Johannes Moser, violinist Geoff Nuttall, and performed newly composed works by Balint Karosi, Paul Kerekes, Michel Petrossian, Frederic Rzewski, and Christopher Theofanidis.


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Dialoghi (2008)

Lutoslawski, Bach, Stucky, De Falla

David Fung, Elinor Frey

    Positive Feedback

"Bob Attiyeh of Yarlung Records is a man on a mission: A quest to produce some of the most exquisite new recordings of classical and jazz music currently being made. His recordings are done to 15 IPS analog tape on the very fine SonoruS ATR-10 and ATR-12 recorders, and then lovingly transferred to Quad DSD via the Merging Technologies HAPI A/D converter, as the highest expression of the original master tape. This particular track from Frey and Fung’s startling album, Dialoghi, shows the remarkable dance of inspiration and passion that the artists engaged in as they explore some of the fiery, moody limits of their instruments. Whenever I have played this performance for visitors to our Positive Feedback reference listening room, or at our hospitality suite at THE Show Newport Beach, the dynamics, texture, and powerful interplay never fail to startle the audience. I’m sure that you’ll feel the same way when you hear it!" - from the booklet of the album NDSD006 'Positive Feedback DSD Sampler'

David W. Robinson

    Positive Feedback Online

The sonics are world class. DG, EMI, Decca, and BMG should take notice! Yarlung is here to stay. Performance A Sound A+

Robert H. Levi[read full review]

Dialoghi (2008)

Lutoslawski, Bach, Stucky, De Falla

David Fung, Elinor Frey

Mastering Engineer:

Yarlung recorded this album directly to two tracks of RMGI 468 analog tape running at 15 ips, with no mixer.  We used the Hapi converter and Pyramix software from Merging Technologies in Switzerland to make these transfers to DSD.  

Producer: Bob Attiyeh
Recording Engineer: Bob Attiyeh
Recording location: Zipper Hall at Colburn School Los Angeles
Recording Type & Bit Rate: Analog to DSD256

This album was recorded to Analog tape. It was then transferred to the DSD bit rate indicated above.

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YAR78876DSD: Dialoghi
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Tracks.
1.
Grave, Metamorphoses for Cello and Piano
Lutoslawski
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2.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for Solo Cello, BWV- I007 Prelude
Bach
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3.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for Solo Cello, BWV- I007 Allemand
Bach
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4.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for solo Cello, BWV- I007 Courante
Bach
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5.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for Solo Cello, BWV- I007 Saraband
Bach
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6.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for Solo Cello, BWV- I007 Minuets
Bach
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7.
Suite No. 1 in G Major for Solo Cello, BWV- I007 Gigue
Bach
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8.
Dialoghi
Stucky
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9.
Nana
De Falla
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